Around the Airport

Friday, July 14, 2017

What You May Have Missed About the New Sinful Sundays


When we decided to restart Sinful Sundays, it was agreed other groups would volunteer to run them or they would not happen.  Ginger and I need to be able to do some other things, and possibly not even be here, yet have them go off without a hitch.  Furthermore, having decided to save Lee Bottom for future generations, it only made sense that everyone play a part.  So far, it's working out nice.

But, there are a few things you may have missed, or maybe we forgot to tell.  First of all, as I just mentioned, different groups will be hosting the events.  Yet, the big change is what's served at the events.  Years ago Ginger and I, plus a select few volunteers, offered the same thing every Sinful Sunday.  Sundaes, Milkshakes, and BBQ.  That is no longer the menu.  Actually, it will change each time depending on what each group wishes to offer.


The menu may vary, but will always be similar.  The first Sinful Sunday was Ehrler's Ice Cream from a truck, the second one was Bernoulli Small Batch served by volunteers, and the food, grilled by another volunteer, has been hamburgers and hot dogs.  Something entirely unique will be on hand for the third, on August 13th.

Other things you may have forgotten, or never known, are that 1) the events run from 12-3PM or until we are out of ice cream and food.  2) There are generally accepted arrival procedures for events at Lee Bottom and they can be found under fly-in arrivals at our old Lee Bottom page. 3) These events, due to most of them using food trucks or vendors to deliver the ice cream, will go on even if the weather isn't perfect. Unless you see it has been called off (on our facebook page or blog), we really hope you'll drive when you cannot fly. This will help keep groups from losing money on the setup.  Remember, it costs money to host these things, even if nobody shows.

Please show your support as these events are here as a way to support the Lee Bottom Aviation Refuge, and the future of the field.


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