Around the Airport

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Ever Need to Explain Commercial Aviation to Someone?

Do you ever get questions about things so common to you as a pilot you don't even think about them anymore? When an airplane lands at the wrong airport do all your friends and family look to you to answer every benign question they have?  Or maybe you're just tired of people not getting it.
What about the everyday life of a commercial pilot; what's it like?  Are there things people can do to make commercial aviation more enjoyable?  How do you spot the difference between this plane and that one? What's the difference between cargo and passenger flying?  The list goes on an on.
If you are a commercial 121 pilot like me, when people ask questions about your job you have little to say.  Sometimes I can't think of a single thing worth mentioning.  But yet when I started writing this I began to realize the endless number of subjects that could be covered which would actually be of interest to a large group of people. That seems to be where Ken Hoke is going with his blog, AeroSavvy.
Ken does a great job of covering the mundane and reminding us those things aren't always as boring as we've come to believe.  In fact, he often proves otherwise.  When he doesn't it's on purpose.  The rest of the time AeroSavvy is covering the exciting parts and explaining them in a manner that makes it understandable to the masses.
Check out his blog to see what I mean.  If he holds course, I think he's found a nice not-so-little niche.  Furthermore, wouldn't it be nice to answer those questions with "Check out AeroSavvy"?

Hey Ken, how about a post that covers the good-natured jabs between pilots?  Being a light twin operator, you'd be perfectly suited for it.

1 comment:

Ken H said...

Hi Rich,

Thanks for the very kind post about AeroSavvy. I just discovered your blog and look forward to reading more! Keep up the great work.

Good natured jabs between pilots? Hmm... reminds me of Orwell's Animal Farm: "4 engines good, 2 engines BETTER!"

Cordially,
Ken Hoke
http://www.AeroSavvy.com